SOGETI UK BLOG

As a Sogeti consultant, I move between client sites frequently. I encounter so many new offices, new people and new processes, I tend to look for familiar traits—someone from a previous job, applications I have used before, or problems I’ve solved in the past. In terms of testing, finding a client that works with tools I am familiar with, such as Quality Centre or TMap® (Test Management Approach), gives me, as a consultant, reassurance and confidence that I can get things done.  One of things that I have learned in my career as a software testing professional is that no matter where you go, you will always find problems with difficult solutions to mitigate: rigorous delivery schedules, lack of budget, etc. This can be frustrating as a consultant because you know there are methodologies in place that can help the clients solve these problems and make their quality assurance process more efficient. Methodologies such as TPI® (Test Process Improvement) and TMap® are designed to help organisations reap the benefits of the testing wisdom that has been gathered over the last couple of decades. Unfortunately, due to lack of information, many test teams do not properly use these methodologies, resulting in organisations spending more time and money on testing than they need to.

From a tester’s perspective, when I go through aTMap® or a TPI® process flow that makes sense and I am familiar with, sometimes I wonder what the point is. Or why bother reading or writing them? In reality, you don’t get the answers to these questions until you start implementing these processes and methodologies in a project. You soon realise that although you are familiar with what they say, you do not always appreciate the effect of these processes until they are put in practice. Once in place, these processes can save organisations money by optimising the testing processes and making sure testing departments are ready to take on planning and execution.

If your organisation wants to learn how to save money or how to benefit from optimising the testing processes, I’d encourage taking a look at Sogeti’s TMap® and TPI® training courses. Even if you don’t end up implementing these methodologies, you’ll still learn a thing or two about software testing!

Nikunj Chadha AUTHOR:
Nikunj is a Managing Consultant at Sogeti

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Unless software testing and quality assurance is an important part of your business, this profession can be hard to fully understand. When I meet people from outside of our industry and explain that I test software professionally, it’s not uncommon to receive a few blank looks.

For those who don’t work in IT, it is understandable that software testing might sometimes seem more like an abstract concept than a defined process. Even those that do understand why software has to be tested, rarely have any idea what that actually involves. That is why I’m always happy to take the time to explain why I think it can be the best job in the world.

Software testing is about getting things to work as they should, and ensuring that this is done well demands a surprising degree of creativity. It requires a keen mind– you’re matching your wits against the potential flow of a set of instructions within a piece of software. It’s about patiently recreating reality – structuring tests to mirror the features and functions that will be used in the real world. It requires imagination – drawing on your experience to find new ways to use the tools at your disposal to uncover secret weaknesses. And, with the speed of modern business, it’s also about doing all this quickly – and comprehensively.

But perhaps the most satisfying thing about testing is that, unlike many jobs, it never becomes stale. Technology is always striding forward, revealing both new challenges and new methodologies for dealing with them, Take the last few years for example – the rise of mobile devices and cloud computing have led to a dramatic increase in complexity. Finding bugs, unveiling usability issues, load testing, security checks – all of these have presented fresh challenges to overcome, requiring us to modify the ways in which we work, while staying in line with business strategies.

Software testers are never allowed to get complacent – there’s always a new intellectual challenge ahead of us.

I feel very fortunate to be able to do something I love professionally. Software testing might not yet have universal recognition from the general public, and I expect I’ll continue to receive a few blank looks from people when I tell them what I do. But that’s fine because I wouldn’t want to do any other job. Software testing is not always easy, but it’s never boring, and it is always hugely rewarding.

Nikunj Chadha AUTHOR:
Nikunj is a Managing Consultant at Sogeti

Posted in: Opinion, Testing and innovation      
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