SOGETI UK BLOG

Computer History MuseumWhich one matters – server or service?

Why are people increasingly preferring Cloud solutions to ‘home-hosted’ ones? It’s because online solutions do not require any infrastructure. Performance troubles can easily be avoided and infrastructure maintenance is not necessary, in absence of machines.

Below are few examples of how Cloud solutions enhance user experience and usability:

  • Software as a Service (SAAS) solution provides an optimised environment for the application and its services.
  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) providers in the Cloud offer more and more ready to use applications and services without any interaction with the machine or the operating system behind, leading to more transparency.

Amazon Web Services

  • Amazon Web Services, through Chef, allow you to deploy and control the entire environment using scripts, without having to log into the machine at any time.
  • Docker goes further by providing application containers, completely unattached to the operating system in which they are deployed.Docker

 

However, even now, most companies host their servers in their own data center. They also like to provide a computer to each employee and make the effort to install and configure applications on each of these computers. But does it still make sense to run a heavy and buggy application locally, on the machine in front of you?

The Chrome Book (on which there is only a web browser) and state-of-the-art mobile devices show that the concept of ‘client-based’ applications is now endangered.

So, the next time you need a new software, do not ask yourself in which device you need to host the application; but rather ask which application would help you avoid buying a useless machine.

To read the original post and add comments, please visit the SogetiLabs blog: The ‘No Machine’ Land

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Tristan Zwingelstein AUTHOR:
Tristan Zwingelstein is a software developer. He is particularly attracted by open sources technologies even if he began his career as a web developer on Microsoft technologies. Then he became owner for maintenance and development of web sites and applications at a web hosting and internet provider company (specialized in open source technologies as Linux/Php/Java JEE). In 2013, he joined Sogeti as a consultant.

Posted in: Behaviour Driven Development, Business Intelligence, Cloud, communication, Digital strategy, e-Commerce, IBM, Innovation, IT strategy, mobile applications, User Experience      
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increased storage needsCompanies, like individuals, are using their personal computers or servers less and less to store their data. The vast majority of worldwide files and data are now stored in the cloud (i.e. on Google Drive, Microsoft Enterprise Storage, Hubic, iCloud, Dropbox…) as these solutions offer expandable or unlimited storage solutions.
But limitless storage still does not exist, global resources in disk space are limited –  even in the cloud – and storage requirements are exploding exponentially.

But how do we stop or at least slow down this growing need for storage requirements?

To begin with, it is clear that the management of our data planet is not at all optimised.

For example:

1) Alice publishes a picture on her personal blog, hosted by OVH, which creates a lot of attention.

2) Bob then downloads that picture and sends it by email to Carol.

3) Carol immediately shares the photo on Facebook.

picture stored three times

Therefore the same data is already saved three times (on OVH, Google Drive and Facebook). As this photo creates a buzz, it is again copied, shared, and sent by thousands of other people…

There is however, a way to significantly reduce this file storage’s cost: the 3 hosting solutions above could share this resource and the picture would be physically stored only once. The applications and systems using this file would only use references to that file.

picture stored once

However, this idea of universal data storage can only work if it is led by an honest and independent organisation.

But how can we trust such a system? And how do you think we could encourage the world to pool data?

To read the original post and add comments, please visit the SogetiLabs blog: 
[One Data Per World]

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Tristan Zwingelstein AUTHOR:
Tristan Zwingelstein is a software developer. He is particularly attracted by open sources technologies even if he began his career as a web developer on Microsoft technologies. Then he became owner for maintenance and development of web sites and applications at a web hosting and internet provider company (specialized in open source technologies as Linux/Php/Java JEE). In 2013, he joined Sogeti as a consultant.

Posted in: Big data, Cloud, Collaboration, Digital, SogetiLabs      
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Capture

‘A good developer is a lazy developer’. That was the first thing I heard during my first Computer Science course. To put this in context, ‘Lazy’ here does not mean ‘work allergic’, but rather ‘doing less to be more efficient’. It is a reality: doing less makes your projects shorter, reduces the need of application maintenance, and is less risky.

In my own opinion, the most important steps – and those that require the biggest efforts in a project – are as follows:

Capture2

I recently had to implement some new functionalitiy on an application extracting interesting data from big log files. This application was implemented in an old low-level programmatical language (for rapidity and optimisation purposes). I started to develop new functionality on this application with this dummy language, but after having written a huge amount of complicated and unstable code, I realised that the application could be simplified with a high-level language.

Fortunately, it then took me only a very short time to completely rewrite the application with the new functionality because the high level language was easier to use, needed less effort, and was more ‘test and debugging friendly’. You might ask why the application was originally developed with this dummy outdated language. The answer is simply for performance and rapidity reasons. Indeed, the new application did become slower using the high-level language, but after replacing the machine hosting the application with a new one, the application actually ran faster than before! As Google says, “Do not waste your time on optimising an application. If your application is too slow, move it on  to 10 machines. If the application is still too slow, move it on to 100 machines …”. Remember to Keep in mind “high level programming” to provide “first class deliveries.”

So what is the role of the modern developer? Nowadays, good developers are no longer crazy geeks who forego sleep one week before a deadline to write as many lines of codes as possible. Good developers are people that are able to select, aggregate, and parameterise the best tools, answering as many of the clients requirements as possible.

Web services are a good example of API not requiring any business developments. They are externally hosted and the functionalities offered are well tested.

So now every time you have something to develop, just keep in mind that it’s highly likely someone has already done it, maintained it, and provided support on it. The more universal your deliveries are, the more they will be understood and accepted by the majority of people. Your real added value is not the number of lines of codes you can write, but how you select the best tools to satisfy your customer. Mr Gates agrees:

BillGates

Tristan Zwingelstein AUTHOR:
Tristan Zwingelstein is a software developer. He is particularly attracted by open sources technologies even if he began his career as a web developer on Microsoft technologies. Then he became owner for maintenance and development of web sites and applications at a web hosting and internet provider company (specialized in open source technologies as Linux/Php/Java JEE). In 2013, he joined Sogeti as a consultant.

Posted in: architecture, Behaviour Driven Development, Developers, Rapid Application Development, Requirements, Software Development, Working in software testing      
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Thief– Hey guys! Let’s go store all of our data in the Cloud!
– Alice: “No! It is too risky”
– Bob: “No! I do not want to pay to host my data!”
– Carol: “I am not sure … remind me, where is ‘the cloud’?”

This is the typical lack of understanding around the Cloud: security, price, property.

Security

BurningFileIn terms of physical security of data, Cloud hosting is, for sure, the safest solution for keeping our data alive. Storing our files on our personal laptop or doing private backups does not protect you against fires, short-circuits, burglary, earthquakes, children’s games, your mother-in-law… Basically, if you think it’s safer to put your money to the bank than in your sockets, you should feel safer to put your data in the Cloud rather than on an isolated and vulnerable hard disk.

Recent events, like the suggested man in the middle of the NSA in Google datacenter or this huge fishing operation on the first telecommuncation French operator, could make you wary of putting your data into the Cloud.

Attacks in the Cloud are like airplane crashes; when they happen there are many victims, but it remains statistically the safest way to transport.

IsBikingSafe

Vigilance

Did you ever think to choose a freshly relaxed prisoner as a babysitter? No, I didn’t think so. So, also, you should choose your cloud solution according to the reputation of the hosting company.

If someone wants to access your data, it is easier for him to rob your house than to hack your Cloud account. Protect and maintain the confidentiality of your password the same as the telephone you use to call your paramour, and your data will be safe.

CloudPrice

Price

Maybe you do not understand what you are paying for when you subscribe to a Cloud solution, but it is the same as paying an insurance for your car or an internet connection. In your subscription, you pay for high accessibility, high availability, and backups of your data– three things you cannot have without a cloud solution.

Trust

The cloud is based on trust with its host / provider. People are afraid because they think the hosts will watch and resell their data. They are right. But banks also use your money, and the question is: what do they do with your money, and can they guarantee that your money will not go away?

CloudHost

It goes without saying that the Cloud is infinitely safer, cheaper and more effective than any existing storage solutions. But at a certain level of confidentiality, we can not afford to entrust all its data to a company, as benevolent as it is. That is why a good compromise would be to move towards new Hybrid Cloud solutions to ensure the grip on your data and to prevent burglary.

Anyway, whether you agree or not, the Cloud is a logical consequence of globalization and free trade. Then brush your teeth and smile: you are already in the Cloud!

Tristan Zwingelstein AUTHOR:
Tristan Zwingelstein is a software developer. He is particularly attracted by open sources technologies even if he began his career as a web developer on Microsoft technologies. Then he became owner for maintenance and development of web sites and applications at a web hosting and internet provider company (specialized in open source technologies as Linux/Php/Java JEE). In 2013, he joined Sogeti as a consultant.

Posted in: Big data, Cloud, Security, SogetiLabs      
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